Landing Page

Experts agree that every page of your Web site is a landing page because you never know where visitors will enter. But when most people use the word “landing page”, they’re talking about a Web page designed for a specific offer.

Welcome to My Web Site

Landing pages have a job. They greet your Web site visitors, introduce you and your company and invite them to continue a relationship with you. (They started the relationship when they clicked to your landing page.)

Landing pages designed for specific offers are a valuable tool for marketers because they’re completely measurable. You can see how well your greeting and introduction work. Do visitors feel welcome and want to take advantage of your offer, or do they click away? You can make improvements and test them for optimal performance.

Starting a Relationship

An effective landing page invites users to interact with you in very specific ways. According to marketing expert and best selling author Seth Godin, your landing page can ask visitors to perform a maximum of two of five things. The five things are:

  • Click to another page
  • Buy something
  • Grant permission to follow up by phone or email
  • Tell a friend
  • Learn something

The action or actions you choose will depend on the offer your landing page is designed for.

When to Use a Landing Page

Anytime you launch a marketing campaign, ask yourself if a landing page is appropriate. If your campaign includes any of the following, you definitely need a landing page:

  1. Pay per click advertising
  2. Email blasts
  3. Banner ads on third-party sites

A landing page is a critical part of an online marketing campaign and should be developed around the same theme and style of your ads or email message.

Can I Just Use My Home Page?

Many businesses run ads and link them to their Web site home page. This is almost always a mistake. As you read above, landing pages are specific, clear and drive visitors to your goal.

A home page is designed for a different purpose. It’s general. It offers an overview and complete navigation for the site. Visitors looking for a specific offer or product can (and most likely will) get lost.

To learn more about preventing your Web site visitors from getting lost, read our section on landing page design.